Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me (2014), directed by James Keach

glen-campbell-ill-be-meA couple of years ago, a friend of mine was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s Disease. I did not see him often, so it was unnerving for me to see him so helpless and confused when I finally visited him. Once a robust, intelligent, and expressive man, he was a shadow of his former self, needing almost 24- hour care. Now his family only had memories of the great man he once was.

I was surprised when I heard about the documentary recounting the life of musical icon Glen Campbell. Titled Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me, the film deals primarily with his Alzheimer’s diagnosis and the subsequent 151-farewell tour show upon which he embarked both to celebrate his music and to share his experience of dealing with Alzheimer’s.

Over the span of his career, Glen Campbell created a large catalog of hit songs including “Rhinestone Cowboy, “ Wichita Lineman,” and “Gentle on My Mind.” He began as a country music star and was the first to crossover into contemporary popular music. In this sense, he opened to door to thousands of country musicians who, until that point in time, played music exclusively for country music fans.

Campbell was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s in 2011. Together with his wife Kim, they decided to go public with the diagnosis and begin a “Goodbye Tour” that was initially supposed to be for three weeks. However, due to strong emotional support and appreciative audience reactions, they continued with a nationwide tour that lasted for 151 shows.

The film begins in the doctor’s office with the diagnosis and it is fascinating to observe the physician’s questions as well as Campbell’s responses. His answers reveal that his memory is becoming more selective about what information it retains. For example, Campbell may not remember who was the first president of the United States because he thinks this is not useful information. However, he remembers song lyrics and how to play the guitar because these things still matter to him.

As the tour progresses, the quality of his performance declines, but his myriad fans do not seem to mind. They consider themselves fortunate to be present at what will probably be one of his final concerts. Throughout the tour, his family and small cadre of musicians, some of whom are family members, give Campbell support and love no matter the outcome of a particular performance. His children feel blessed to spend this time with their Dad.

Near the end of the tour, the question is asked why Campbell agreed to do the tour. The answer: he genuinely wanted to perform again and his family felt that his performance would give more media attention to Alzheimer’s, a disease afflicting so many Americans, and, by extension, to their caregivers whose lives are dramatically changed when they take care of loved one who may not even remember their names or who they are.

Jewish tradition emphasizes the dignity of man. We all are created in God’s image and are deserving of respect no matter our physical or mental condition. The image of God can still exist in a body damaged by disease or in a mind damaged by mental illness. Alzheimer’s does not define our value from the aspect of eternity.

One of the most touching moments in the film occurs when Campbell sings “A Better Place, “ a song that expresses his hopeful spirit in the midst of his mental decline. Here are the lyrics that resonate: “Some days I’m so confused. Lord/ My past gets in my way/ I need the ones I love, Lord/ More and more each day/ One thing I know/ The world’s been good to me/ A better place awaits, you’ll see.”

Glen Campbell: I’ll be Me is a one-of-of-a-kind movie, a film that reminds us of the fragility of life. What life is like today may not be what it is tomorrow. This is a life lesson that relates not only to those afflicted with debilitating disease, but to all of us making life’s journey.

Purchase this movie from Amazon.com.

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