The Mustang (2019), directed by Laure de Clermont-Tonnerre

I have met a few angry people in the course of my life. One stands out. He was a Civics teacher in my junior high school who played pick-up basketball games with his students. If a student missed a critical shot, he would forcefully slap him on the head. Of course, this was in the 1950s and such behavior was often overlooked by the administration. I played ball with him on occasion; but once I saw him slap the student, I stopped playing with him for fear I might be his next target.

Anger is a dangerous emotion because an angry person is not in control of his emotions and can do some very bad things. The Mustang is about a very angry man who does terrible deeds, but who is given a chance to change his behavior and redeem himself.

The film opens as a herd of wild horses is galloping through the prairie. Suddenly a helicopter’s whirring blades is heard over the quiet landscape. The helicopter is prodding the herd to enter corrals and trucks that are part of a roundup of mustangs by the US government. We are informed that more than 100,000 horses are roaming the countryside, but the government can only manage a small number of them.

In order to determine which horses will find a home, prisoners are given an opportunity to train them for conventional uses. An auction is held at the end of a 5-week training period. The training time serves as therapy for the prisoner who, like the horses, is wild and difficult to tame.

Roman Coleman has been in prison for 12 years after leaving his domestic partner permanently brain damaged in an act of uncontrollable violence. Guilt overwhelms him, and he resists being reintegrated back into society, arguing that “I’m not good with people.” He makes no effort to leave the confines of prison, even though it means his daughter will be left parentless.

While working in a prison maintenance detail, rancher Myles, who runs the prison’s rehabilitation program, assigns Roman to train one of the wild mustangs. Initially, Roman has problems, but slowly he learns to control his own aggressive nature and make progress with his horse, whom he names Marcus.

Rabbi Jonathan Sacks writes about the trait of anger: “In general, Maimonides, like Aristotle, believed that emotional intelligence consists in striking a balance between excess and deficiency, too much and too little. Too much fear makes me a coward, too little makes me rash and foolhardy, taking unnecessary risks. The middle way is courage. There are, however, two exceptions, says Maimonides: pride and anger. Even a little pride or anger is wrong.”

Moreover, he quotes Talmudic sources that speak about the terrible consequences of anger: “One who yields to anger is like one who had worshipped idols (Shabbat 105b). The life of those who can’t control their anger is not a life, they said (Pesachim 113b). Resh Lakish said, When a person becomes angry, if he is a sage his wisdom departs from him; if he is a prophet his prophecy departs from him (Pesachim 66b).

Rabbi Sacks continues: “What is dangerous about anger is that it causes us to lose control. While in its grip, we lose the ability to step back and judge the possible consequences of our actions. The result is that in a moment of irascibility we can do or say things we may regret for the rest of our lives.”

Roman Coleman, by learning to be sensitive to the behavior of a wild mustang, learns to be sensitive to other human beings. Anger no longer dominates his personality; and he desires his future relationships to express forgiveness and love. He is repentant and repentance for him is the gateway to personal salvation.

Purchase this movie from Amazon.com.

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